Distributed Spare Capacity To Place Ability

Technology is allowing a degree of sharing so large that new mediums of communication are creating a cascade of new engagements. As a result, we are entering a new era where solutions to market problems can be optimized by tapping into spare capacity held by individuals distributed in the community. Several monikers and catch phrases are used to help describe this new era: Shared Economy, Web 2.0, Crowdsourcing, Cognitive Surplus, Collaborative Consumption, App Economy, or Gamification. Welcome to the rise of the platformed business model to solve market problems!

In human services, adopting a platformed business model to place ability at best-fit can reinforce the career development paradigms of vocational guidance, career education, and life design. However, leaders in this space must accept that a fourth closely aligned paradigm is needed to subsidize development. I call it placement liquidity. I believe that best-fit is achieved by utilizing these four paradigms:

  1. Placement liquidity that views talent seekers and candidates as principals (i.e. buyers and sellers) in a transaction who may be characterized by willingness and compromise and who may be helped by participating in efficient marketplaces to eliminate pain points quickly.
  2. Vocational guidance that views principals as actors who may be characterized by individual differences, styles, and scores on personality traits and who may be helped by matching for resemblance to identify occupational fit.
  3. Career education that views principals as agents who may be characterized by individual development and readiness to make decisions appropriate to stages and who may be helped by implementing new attitudes, beliefs, and competencies to foster individual development.
  4. Life design that views principals as authors who may be characterized by autobiographical stories and who may be helped by reflecting on themes to construct a satisfying and productive life.

Depending on talent seeker and candidate constraints however, assistance may apply interventions that reflect any one of the different paradigms.

Most importantly, solution providers (professionals and academics included) must be aware that the market will not benefit from any solution unless it is built on a viable and sustainable business model to deliver the value proposition. As such, we shouldn’t forget the adage: “Businesses don’t fail, business models fail”.

What do you think needs to happen to see the improvements we are looking for?

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